Senior woman spared jail sentence for bestiality with three dogs

A 64-year-old woman filmed committing bestiality with a St Bernard, a black Labrador and an Alsatian, told a judge at Lincoln Crown Court she didn’t know it was illegal. Carol Bowditch, 64, was filmed at a disgusting sex party where owners watched their dogs having intercourse with women and then carrying on sexual contact with each other.

According to Lincolnshire Live, the bizarre situation had been posted on an Internet forum specializing in bestiality resulting in a RAF Police investigation leading the authorities to Bosditch’s home where the video was discovered. The prosecutor, Victoria Rose described nearly nine minutes of video, graphically showing Bosditch having sex with the St. Bernard dog named Oscar. The defendant admitted the disturbing actions took place over several years.
Daniel Galloway, 65, admitted aiding and abetting Bowditch to have intercourse with the dog. He also admitted charges of making indecent images of children, possession of a prohibited image of a child, distributing 1,861 indecent images of children and possession of extreme pornography.  Judge Michael Heath sentenced Bosditch to  a one-year community service order with supervision and a four-month night time curfew. She could have received a two-year prison sentence. Galloway was jailed for 12 months, must register as a sex offender for ten years and was made the subject of a sexual harm prevention order.

“What you engaged in was first of all unlawful and secondly disgusting. I am told that you have received public humiliation as a result of the publicity that this case has attracted. That does not surprise me,” Judge Heath told Bosditch.
As for Galloway, Judge Heath had even harsher words:

“It is beyond me to understand how you having a female partner stood by, and further aided and abetted your partner to have sex with three dogs. But that wasn’t the end of it. You also downloaded indecent images of children.”

Photos via rescue and Lincolnshire Live

Woman faces animal cruelty charges in ‘heartbreaking’ case

PRATTVILLE — An Autauga County woman faces half a dozen cruelty to animal charges in what the sheriff calls a “heartbreaking” case.

Linda Thomas McDonald, 67, of  County Road 39, faces six misdemeanor counts of cruelty to animals, courthouse records show. She was released Wednesday after posting bonds totaling $18,000. She could not be reached for comment, and jail records show she doesn’t have an attorney.

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The dogs suffered from “severe” mange and a scabies infestation, said Sheriff Joe Sedinger.

“It’s horrible the shape these dogs are in,” he said. “It’s heartbreaking. This is the worst case of neglect I’ve ever seen.”

Five of the six dogs are in such poor shape, they were set to be euthanized Wednesday, upon recommendation from a veterinarian, said Claudia Risgby, director of the Prattville-Autauga Humane Shelter. The dogs were taken to the shelter after they were seized by deputies.

“They are suffering horribly,” she said, Wednesday.

The sheriff’s office confirmed  that the five dogs had been put down.

Shelter officials felt the sixth dog, who was in better shape than the others, possibly could be saved. However, that dog had to be euthanized Thursday due to scabies infestation, the sheriff’s office said

Photos taken by the sheriff’s office animal control officer show five dogs with no hair at all. It’s impossible to distinguish the breed of the dogs from the photos. One photo shows a dog with no hair, covered in scabs and open, running sores.

Deputies arrived at the address about 8:30 a.m. Tuesday to serve a search warrant in an unrelated case. The dogs were found in a “small, camper trailer,” Sedinger said.

“There’s no way she could have not known these dogs were in such bad shape,” he said. “I just can’t understand how someone could let animals get like this.”

 

Oklahoma City couple accused of sharing child porn, bestiality videos

 Tiffany Webb

OKLAHOMA CITY – An Oklahoma City couple were arrested Monday, accused of sharing child pornography involving sex with animals.

“While we’ve made many child pornography arrests over the past six years, this is the first time we’ve arrested a married couple for possession of child pornography,” Canadian County Sheriff Chris West said.

In addition to child pornography, investigators found an extensive collection of bestiality videos.

“I was shocked and sickened to learn the Webb’s collection included bestiality videos involving children,” West said.

Benjamin J. Webb, 33, and Tiffany L. Webb, 34, were arrested Monday after an investigation that began last month, Capt. Adam Flowers said.

Investigators received child pornography on an undercover computer programmed to detect people trading explicit child pornography. Multiple devices including cellular phones, tablets, and laptops were seized for forensic examination.

Two laptops were examined on location and determined to contain hundreds of images of child pornography, Flowers said.

The Webbs were taken to the Canadian County jail where they were jailed on two counts of aggravated possession of child pornography, and a Computer Crimes Act violation.

They both remain jailed in lieu of $250,000 bail.

Woman sentenced in dog abuse case

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60 days in jail with 5 years’ probation

Amber Finney, 33, of Warren, appeared before Warren Municipal Court Judge Terry Ivanchak, who sentenced her to 180 days in jail but suspended 120 of them. He also credited Finney for the 33 days she has been in the Trumbull County Jail.

The judge also fined Finney $300 and put her on five years’ probation. As terms of her probation, the woman is not allowed to own any animals during the five-year period.

The charges stem from a video released in January that showed a woman performing s&x acts on a dog. Police arrested Finney about 9 p.m. April 9 at her home at 1125 Ward St. NW.

Finney is the first person charged under the city’s best@lity law, the first law of its kind to be passed in Ohio. The law provides enhanced penalties for those convicted of having s&x with animals and was passed unanimously June 22 by City Council.

The law made bestiality a first-degree misdemeanor, which means a convicted person may receive a jail sentence of up to 180 days and given a $1,000 fine for each count. If someone is found guilty, he or she may be required to pay for boarding and care of the animals.

The law originated from the 2016 case of Salvador Rendon of Warren, who investigators say had s&x multiple times over six years with two boxers in his Ward Street NW home. Rendon pleaded guilty to a charge of animal cruelty and also received a short jail sentence.

Ohio lawmakers later passed a law banning besti@lity in the state.

Ex-Soldier Charged In NC Dog’s Shooting Found Dead, Police Say

FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (WNCN) — One of two people who were charged with shooting and killing a dog last month in Fayetteville has died, police say.

Marinna Rollins, 23, and Jarren Heng, 25, faced felony charges of cruelty to animals and conspiracy after a dog was shot five times. Rollins, who had been stationed at Fort Bragg but ended her military service in January 2017, was found dead around 3 a.m. Sunday, Fayetteville police.

Police said that Rollins, who was charged on April 24 in the service dog’s death, was found dead at 5600 Netherfield Place.

Police are investigating Rollins’ death as a suicide.

The dog, named “Cumboui,” was shot with a rifle, court documents say.

Rollins’ estranged husband, Matt Dyer, a Fort Bragg soldier, adopted the dog, then named “Huey,” before being deployed to Korea for a year.

Dyer says that, although he and Rollins were separated, she agreed to care for Huey during his deployment.

Dyer told CBS North Carolina that during his deployment, Rollins got Huey certified as an emotional support dog.

Rollins then changed the dog’s name to “Cambouis.”

“I felt like her having to take care of Huey would be good for her and would be good for Huey,” Dyer said.

Deputies also said there is video evidence in the dog shooting case the DA’s office said it will use.

A close friend of Rollins’ uploaded video of the shooting to Facebook, saying they hoped it would get attention leading to punishment.

“It’s been real, Cammy, I love you. You’re my puppy. You’re a good puppy,” a woman is heard on the video saying.

In the last video clip, the woman goes over to her now-dead dog, picks him up, shoves him over, says “I love you, you’re a good dog” and then covers him with some kind of sheet.

Rollins was due back in court with Heng later this month. A protest is planned at the court house

Woman arrested for shooting at teen for attempting to r*pe dog

CENTERTON, AR (KNWA) — A woman was arrested in April after police said she shot at a teen who was  assaulting her neighbor’s dog.

Kerrie Lenkerd told police she looked out her bedroom window and saw a teen assaulting her neighbor’s dog. Lenkerd said this wasn’t the first time she has caught the teen doing the act to the animal.

Lenkerd told police she went to get her gun and confronted the teen. Lenkerd said the teen jumped the fence and that she also exited her fence with her gun and shot into the grass to scare the teen.

Witnesses told police they heard a loud pop and saw the teen, who was wearing just boxers and a shirt, running down the road.

Lenkerd was arrested for aggravated assault.

Police said the teenager was also arrested for two counts of abuse.

 

Man who killed dog in Auburn gets 2½ years in prison

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WORCESTER – A former Auburn man charged with assaulting his girlfriend and beating her dog to death because it was keeping him awake was sentenced to state prison Monday after pleading guilty to animal cruelty, assault and firearm charges.

Gregory Fargnoli, 27, formerly of 16 Hill St., Auburn, was arrested Nov. 17, 2015, after police were called to the Hill Street home in Auburn by a roommate, who said he found the dog, a 12-year-old Catahoula named Polka Dot, dead and that he was unable to awaken Mr. Fargnoli. Mr. Fargnoli’s girlfriend at the time, Tabitha L. Taylor, told investigators that when Mr. Fargnoli was finally awakened and asked what had happened, he said, “I silenced the dog.”

The woman told police she had gone to work and received a text from Mr. Fargnoli saying the dog had bitten him twice. The text also read, “I can’t take this. I should be sleep,” according to the woman. When she returned home that afternoon, she said, she found her boyfriend asleep and her dog dead.

A forensic necropsy by a doctor at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University determined that the dog died from blunt force trauma. A broom handle and a broken mop handle found near the dog’s body bore bite marks from the dog, which suffered at least 23 rib fractures, collapsed lungs, ten broken teeth, a brain bleed, internal bleeding and cuts and bruises from multiple blows, according to the report by Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore, research assistant professor at Tufts and president of the Boston-based Forensic Veterinary Investigations.

The report said there was also evidence “consistent with animal sexual assault” and “suggestive of forceful penetration of the dog’s vagina.”

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While police were at the home, Ms. Taylor told them Mr. Fargnoli had tried to strangle her during an argument weeks earlier. After learning that Mr. Fargnoli had a firearm in the home, police said they obtained a search warrant and recovered a 9mm handgun with the serial number defaced and ammunition.

Ms.Taylor, who is from Louisiana, said she met Mr. Fargnoli online in March of 2015 and later came to live with him in Massachusetts.

Thug caught stamping on pooch tells court ‘I love animals’

A DRUNKEN thug caught on CCTV kicking and stamping on his pet dog told a court he “loved animals”.

 

Richard Cheshire was half naked when he threw his pooch Pablo across the floor, kicked and stamped on his head, the court heard.

Security cameras filmed the attack in a tower block where the 34-year-old lived.

Cheshire, of Oldbury in Birmingham, pleaded guilty to causing unnecessary suffering to a dog.

As he left Birmingham crown court after being sentenced he shouted: “I want you to know, I love animals”.

Cheshire animal abuse

SICK: Cheshire stamped and kicked on the poor dog

Rafe Turner, prosecuting, said the RSPCA launched an investigation after being shown CCTV of the incident last September.During the 30-minute attack, Cheshire also spat and swore at the poor creature as it “cowered and whimpered”.

Mr Turner said: ”The dog keeps running away and not coming to heel, probably with good reason, while the defendant chases after it.”

He added that the bull terrier-type dog ran into the lift to try escape Cheshire while he continued his attack.

The court heard that Cheshire was “clearly intoxicated”.

His defence council, Sukhdip Randhawa, said Cheshire suffered from anxiety and depression and used alcohol to cope.

Cheshire animal abuseSWNSCOWER: The dog was backed into the lift

Cheshire animal abuseSWNSSAFE: The dog has since been taken by the RSPCA and will be rehomed

 

Trump Administration Strips Animal Rights Safeguards, Pets Now At Risk

On Friday, the Trump administration ordered the U.S. Department of Agriculture to remove inspection reports and other similar information regarding the treatment and welfare of thousands of animals from its website, The Washington Post reports.

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The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health inspection Service released a statement claiming the decision came after a “comprehensive review”. According to the statement posted to their site, “As a result of the comprehensive review, APHIS has implemented actions to remove certain personal information from documents it posts on APHIS’ website involving the Horse Protection Act and the Animal Welfare Act. Going forward, APHIS will remove from its website inspection reports, regulatory correspondence, research facility annual reports, and enforcement records that have not received final adjudication.  APHIS will also review and redact, as necessary, the lists of licensees and registrants under the AWA, as well as lists of designated qualified persons (DQPs) licensed by USDA-certified horse industry organizations.”

Essentially now violations against the Animal Welfare Act and the Horse Protection Act will only become accessible after submitting a Freedom of Information Act Request (FOIA) — which can take several years to get approved. The statement goes on to explain:

‘Those seeking information from APHIS regarding inspection reports, regulatory correspondence, and enforcement records should submit Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests for that information.  Records will be released when authorized and in a manner consistent with the FOIA and Privacy Act.’

The records previously made available by the USDA were often accessed by animal rights activists in their efforts to monitor animal welfare at circuses, zoos, and scientific labs. Individuals looking to adopt pets could also use the site’s online database to find information about dog breeders before purchasing pets. Seven states require pet stores to source puppies through breeders with clean USDA inspection reports, but with the removal of the documents, where the puppies come from will likely no longer be traceable.

Since the news surfaced Friday evening, animal welfare organizations have spoken out to condemn the USDA’s removal of the information, as many believe it will only allow animal abuses to be swept under the rug.

Senior director of the Humane Society’s Stop Puppy Mills Campaign, John Goodwin, told The Washington Post:

‘The USDA action cloaks even the worst puppy mills in secrecy and allows abusers of Tennessee walking horses, zoo animals and lab animals to hide even the worst track records in animal welfare.’

It’s unclear at this point as to whether or not the information removed is a permanent or temporary change.

The senior vice president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), Kathy Guillermo, said it’s “a shameful attempt to keep the public from knowing when and which laws and regulations have been violated. Many federally registered and licensed facilities have long histories of violations that have caused terrible suffering.”

Many have referenced the usefulness of the resource, saying it allowed organizations to track animal welfare in labs that otherwise lack transparency.